The Pros and Cons of Dip Nails

Pros and Cons of Dip Nails
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With the ever-increasing list of skills we needed to teach ourselves in 2020, one of the major ones was becoming our own nail techs. Many people turned to the internet to provide them a simple and easy alternative from getting our standard full set done at the nail salon.

Turns out it was easier than we expected with the rise in popularity of dip nail powder kits. Creating a set of dip nails turned out to be almost as easy as painting your nails. Couple that with the new and improved nail tips and glue available to the average consumer, and you’re well on your way to saving hundreds of dollars a year on manicures.

But is the hype real? What are the pros and cons of dip nails? Here we spill the tea on the latest beauty trend.

Are Dip Nails Sanitary?

As much as we don’t like going and spending our hard-earned money at the nail salon anymore, is it sanitary to do your own dip nails at home? Let’s look at the steps on creating a set to determine if you can create a sanitary environment in your home space.

Basically, all that’s needed to create a set of nails with dip powder is:

  • a nail buffer
  • nail file
  • nail tips and glue
  • the base step for the powder
  • the powder itself
  • the activator
  • and a quick-dry topcoat 

Dip powder doesn’t require UV curing, and it also doesn’t require a nail drill for shaping. You can do it all with basic manicure tools.

So, dip nails, especially because the powders come sealed in their own individual pots, are as sanitary as applying regular nail polish.

Pros and Cons of Dip Nails - Nail Dip Accessories
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Are Dip Nails Healthy?

Many buyers believe that dip nails and dip powder are better for your nails than a traditional full acrylic set. While that is somewhat true, there needs to be some clearing up. 

Dip powder, at the end of the day, is an acrylic powder. You’re simply applying it with glue and using a monomer-like activator to harden it once it’s applied on your nails. Unlike a traditional set, where the manicurist uses a monomer-soaked brush and forms the nails wet with a bead of acrylic, in dip nails you’re using a careful and thin application of glue to get the powder to stick to your nail first.

So, the dip powder itself can do the same sort of damage to your nail plate as acrylic does. But, (and it’s a big but) you’ll still be causing a lot less damage with dip nails at home than with acrylics in a salon. 

You’ll be avoiding the typical sanding down of the natural nail plate that the manicurist does with their nail drill — so you won’t be thinning out your nail. You’ll be using a hand buffer to remove shine only, so it won’t cause brittle and easily broken natural nails post removal. 

Removal is easier because you can melt the powder off with an acetone soak and generally won’t need an electric file to remove the nails. This is a far less abrasive removal method, and it keeps your natural nails far more healthy than traditional acrylic application and removal.

Is Dip Powder Good for Your Nails?

While we have established that dip powder is not as bad for your nails as a traditional acrylic application — could dip powder be considered good for your nails?

I think this depends on the definition of good you’re using. Dip powder is fantastic at giving you a super long-lasting manicure without UV cured gel involved. This protects the natural nails from breakage and splitting, unlike traditional nail polish.

However, you do have to prepare the nail plate by buffing the shine and using a dehydrator to get the maximum adherence and avoid lifting. So, it’s not as good for your nails as wearing them naked or with traditional polish. There is a higher chance of damage to your nail plate during application.

Beautiful Dip Nails
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Dip Powder Nails Pros and Cons

Now that we have gone over the main questions you come across for dip nails, and dip powder, let’s get into the head to head. Here we will list the pros and cons of dip powder nails.

Dip Powder Nails: The Pros

  • Easy application for beginners
  • Can apply yourself at home
  • Available in a huge variety of colors and glitters
  • Much less expensive than a typical set in a nail salon
  • Less risk of exposure to infection or virus from improperly sanitized workstations
  • Less risk of injury since you’re doing your own nails
  • Full control over how long or short to do your nails
  • Lasts a full 4 weeks or more without chipping or breaking if following application instructions correctly

Dip Powder Nails: The Cons

  • The set comes with a similar set of issues for your nail plate as a traditional acrylic full set
  • Hard to correct mistakes if you allow the powder to fully cure before addressing them
  • Difficult to remove, so not ideal if you are someone who likes to change their nails a lot
  • Better quality dip powders are more expensive
  • There is a higher up-front investment of cash to get all the tools and powders necessary to do your nails
  • There is a learning curve, so it can be hard to get a perfectly smooth surface when you’re first starting out

So, Are Dip Powder Nails for You?

In the new world we live in, are you going to start doing your own nails? If you’re sick of just plain nail polish and aren’t ready to take the plunge into the investment of gel and UV lamps, dip powder nails are a great place to start.

It’s a less expensive way to get started, and you’ll have the overwhelming pride and satisfaction that you did your nails yourself whenever you receive a compliment.

Looking for the best dip powder kit to get you started? We have got your back. Check out our full list here and get ready to start dipping your nails!

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